5 Tips On Writing an Effective Technical EBook by Levi Spaid

 

Thinking of creating your own book or e-book which includes technical language?  Then, here are points to consider.  I followed these guidelines to create my first e-book for my students who were learning to use an iPad for the first time.

1.  In writing any book the first rule is know your audience.  This will shape and change the language you will use.  For example, if you are writing for beginners then go easy on the technical terminology.  Remember to include clear examples that relate to the audience when you use a technical word.  In writing my first book, I asked my students directly what they wanted to learn about the iPad and I asked them what they was giving them the most trouble.  Asking your intended audience directly will help you shape the topics to include.

2. Do your research by looking at other examples.  Learn from other authors and experts who cover your topic.  You want to be redundant but taking a look at other technical authors will also help you form and organize your chapters.  Look at the top leaders and sellers under your topic to see what they are doing differently from their competitors. 

3. Include high quality references and finished videos.  Adding diagrams

Thinking of creating your own book or e-book which includes technical language?  Then, here are points to consider.  I followed these guidelines to create my first e-book for my students who were learning to use an iPad for the first time.

1.  In writing any book the first rule is know your audience.  This will shape and change the language you will use.  For example, if you are writing for beginners then go easy on the technical terminology.  Remember to include clear examples that relate to the audience when you use a technical word.  In writing my first book, I asked my students directly what they wanted to learn about the iPad and I asked them what they was giving them the most trouble.  Asking your intended audience directly will help you shape the topics to include.

2. Do your research by looking at other examples.  Learn from other authors and experts who cover your topic.  You want to be redundant but taking a look at other technical authors will also help you form and organize your chapters.  Look at the top leaders and sellers under your topic to see what they are doing differently from their competitors. 

3. Include high quality references and videos.  Adding diagrams, charts, and quality videos will only enhance your text.  Learning a complex skill or absorbing technical terms is best learned through demonstration.  Provide your audience with professional videos and pictures to help them understand how everything fits together.  Show the readers how something works.  They are more likely to retain the information using audio, video, and written words.  

4. Organize your text into smaller paragraphs for technical books or guides.  Unless your target audience is advanced, slow down.  I remember students in my course telling me, "You went over my head" when I was trying to explain something I assumed was basic knowledge.  Think back to times when you first learned something new and apply to your writing.  

5. Write in plain language as much as possible.  Your written voice should be clear and focused.  Stay on track for your audience.  Don't overwhelm them with complex words and flowery language. You are there to teach your audience, not give them a vocabulary lesson - unless that is your goal.

4. Organize your text into smaller paragraphs for technical books or guides.  Unless your target audience is advanced, slow down.  I remember students in my course telling me, "You went over my head" when I was trying to explain something I assumed was basic knowledge.  Think back to times when you first learned something new and apply to your writing.  

5. Use clear, simple, and concise language as much as possible.  Your written voice should be clear and focused.  Stay on track for your audience.  Don't overwhelm them with complex words and flowery language. Don't abuse the thesaurus.  You are there to teach your audience, not give them a vocabulary lesson.

 

- Levi Spaid

Author and Teacher of "iPad for Beginners - available in our store.   

http://levispaid.wordpress.com

Visit our Little Lucy Lovebugs Shop for more information about his book.